Call Now 877-FOOT-911 Call Now 877-FOOT-911

ami-white

ADVANCED Minimally
Invasive Bunionette Surgery

TRADEMARKED BUNIONETTE PROCEDURE

Minimally Invasive Bunionette Surgery

Dr. K's trademarked minimally invasive AMI-BUNIONETTE™ surgery is usually outpatient surgery, so you don’t have to stay overnight in a hospital. You should also have a quick recovery with minimal, if any, scarring, pain and swelling . Once you have had this surgery, the bunionette should not return, but you should still wear shoes with a wide toe box for the health of your feet.

Minimally Invasive Bunionette Surgery
Minimally Invasive Bunionette Surgery
DEVELOPED & PERFECTED BY DR. K

The conservative treatment for a bunionette is to wear shoes that have a wide toe box and/or use a sleeve to avoid rubbing the bony bump. If the bony bump gets worse, then Dr. Alireza Khosroabadi (Dr. K) will perform his advanced minimally invasive AMI-BUNIONETTE™ bunionette surgery.

He makes a small (5mm) incision to remove the bony bump, smooth the bone edges and fix the alignment of the bone inside the foot.

ARE YOU SUFFERING FROM BUNIONETTES?

We can help, we have treated hundreds of cases of Bunionettes. We can help you get back on your feet and improve your quality of life.

BOOK A VIRTUAL CONSULTATION

BUNIONETTE FAQs


What is a bunionette?

A bunionette is a little bump where your little toe meets your foot (the joint). Just like a bunion on your big toe, a bunionette makes your little toe turn inward and the joint sticks outward. The bump may be painless at the beginning, but can become swollen, red, and painful.






What causes a bunionette?

A bunionette may be caused by wearing shoes that are too small and/or inheriting a faulty mechanical structure (runs in the family). High-heel shoes or shoes with narrow pointed toe boxes can rub against the bunionette and cause redness, swelling and pain.






Do women get bunionettes more than men?

Bunionettes are much more common in women (because of shoes that are too small), but both men and woman have been known to get bunionettes from wearing tight shoes.






How do I know for sure that I have a bunionette?

A foot doctor (Dr. K) can examine your foot and take X-rays to see extent of the problem inside your foot.






What kind of treatment do I need for a bunionette?

The first options should be non-surgical treatments like changing to shoes that have a wider toe box. The bunionette can also be padded with over-the-counter bunion cushions, which will require a shoe with a wide-enough toe area.

If your bunionette becomes inflamed, then you would need to put at an icepack on it. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as Advil or Aleve can also help. A foot doctor (Dr. K) can inject corticosteroid to help bring down the inflammation and pain.






Will I need surgery for my bunionette?

If your bunionette continues to give you pain, then surgery may be needed to realign the little toe’s bone so that it does not point outward. Minimally invasive bunionette surgery involves making a very small incision to make this correction.

The surgery is usually an outpatient procedure and results in little if any scar tissue on the outside or inside (swelling). You should be back on your feet very soon after this surgery.

VISIT OUR CUTTING EDGE SURGERY CENTER



  CONTACT US

LIVE CHAT ➤